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Vajiko Chachkhiani, Winter which was not there, 2017, HD video, color, sound, 12 minutes 30 seconds.

Vajiko Chachkhiani

Daniel Marzona

Vajiko Chachkhiani, Winter which was not there, 2017, HD video, color, sound, 12 minutes 30 seconds.

“For me, it is important to let works happen—I don’t approach a work by thinking, ‘Now I’m going to make a sculpture,’” Vajiko Chachkhiani once remarked. The Georgian artist’s recent exhibition “Summer which was not there” certainly foregrounded the question of what makes certain works feel “natural” and others less so. The show consisted of nine sculptural works and two videos, of which the latest, Winter which was not there, 2017, was without a doubt the show’s highlight—its down-to-earth poetry and fine sense of understatement conveyed a convincing inevitability.

As the video begins, we see a statue being pulled out of the sea by a crane as a man watches from shore. One thinks of the statues of Lenin that were removed after the fall of Communism in Eastern Europe. But this is no Lenin: The stone face looks like that of the man watching. One wonders who he could be.

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