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Anu Põder, Composition with a Torso and a Child’s Hands, 1986, textile, wood, plastic, epoxy, 21 5/8 × 24 3/8 × 14 1/8".

Anu Põder

Art Museum of Estonia | Kumu

Anu Põder, Composition with a Torso and a Child’s Hands, 1986, textile, wood, plastic, epoxy, 21 5/8 × 24 3/8 × 14 1/8".

Estonian sculptor Anu Põder (1947–2013) has been internationally unrecognized for too long. The curator of“Anu Põder: Be Fragile! Be Brave!,” Rebeka Põldsam, attempted to put her on the map and into the broader canon of art history by presenting her outstanding oeuvre next to those of precursors and contemporaries, including Katrin Koskaru, Ursula Mayer, Ana Mendieta, Alina Szapocznikow, and Iza Tarasewicz. Like Szapocznikow, Põder draws upon an artistic strategy of merging representations of fragmented body parts with amorphous masses of various materials: Torsos emerge and sink back into dark clouds of synthetic wool in works such as Põder’s Composition with Plastic and Synthetic Wool, 1986, and Szapocznikow’s similar Tumours Personified, 1971, in which casts of the artist’s face seem to be fighting shapeless tumors’ attempts to suck them in. Anxiety about the body is pertinent

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