new-york

Maureen Gallace, Clear Day, 2011–12, oil on panel, 14 × 18".

Maureen Gallace

MoMA PS1

Maureen Gallace, Clear Day, 2011–12, oil on panel, 14 × 18".

“Clear Day,” Maureen Gallace’s serene and dazzling retrospective at MoMA PS1, spans twenty-five years and includes more than seventy small oil paintings, though it seems there might be more like seven hundred of them, winding through the exhibition’s second floor in an airy parade. As you wander from room to room, the succession of white walls dramatizes not just the light-flooded intensity of Gallace’s canvases and their compact proportions (which hover around the intimate, sketch-book scale of nine by twelve inches), but the inexhaustibility and expansiveness of her narrow project. The artist always depicts views of an ambiguous New England countryside or coastland (and sometimes bouquets of flowers) in a fast, smart style—Fairfield Porter with a dash of Karen Kilimnik. Gallace walks a tightrope, balancing her compositional agility and tasteful color schemes with savvy

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