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Sturtevant, Study for Muybridge Plate #136, 1966, twelve black-and-white photographs, glue, black paper, graphite, 8 5/8 × 6 1/2".

Sturtevant

Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac | Marais

Sturtevant, Study for Muybridge Plate #136, 1966, twelve black-and-white photographs, glue, black paper, graphite, 8 5/8 × 6 1/2".

The viewer of Sturtevant’s photographs hardly need be told they are hers to realize something is awry. In images seemingly familiar from the oeuvres of Marcel Duchamp, Joseph Beuys, and Eadweard Muybridge, Sturtevant is seen striking the poses we know so well, or striding along in recognizable apparel like Beuys’s full-length fur-lined coat—or in the nude. As if this twist of the already-known wasn’t discomfiting enough, she also used techniques of collage, montage, cropping, and multiplication to unsettle habitual modes of perception. For instance, a peephole-shaped photograph of her own body, Duchamp Untitled, 1997, draws in the viewer as voyeur, but only to distance him or her further by disrupting visual pleasure with the psychological stress of conceptual inconsistency. And just as the viewer is starting to make sense of the oscillatory movement between contradictory

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