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Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe’s Lips, 1962, synthetic polymer, silk-screen ink, and pencil on canvas, 6' 10 3/4“ x 13' 7”.

Andy Warhol

Museo Jumex

Andy Warhol, Marilyn Monroe’s Lips, 1962, synthetic polymer, silk-screen ink, and pencil on canvas, 6' 10 3/4“ x 13' 7”.

Although “Andy Warhol: Dark Star” included a range of works from 1951 through 1978 installed on every floor of the museum, its great success was in shedding new light on the best-known phase of the Pop artist’s career, between 1961 and 1972. Instead of assuming Warhol’s paintings of that time to be interchangeable and of equal value, as others have done, curator Douglas Fogle stressed the variety of distinguishing decisions—aesthetic as well as thematic—that the artist made.

For example, Fogle opted to juxtapose Large Campbell’s Soup Can, 1964, a painting of a single pristine, solitary tin, with another sporting a ripped red-and-white label (Big Torn Campbell’s Soup Can [Pepper Pot],1962), and a third depicting cans of beef noodle soup in a grid (100 Cans, 1962). In the same vein, there was a smiling Jacqueline Kennedy, moments before JFK’s assassination, as well as a

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