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Charles McGee, Rhapsody in Black and White, 2008, ink jet on Dibond, 60 x 118 x 4".

Charles McGee

Library Street Collective

Charles McGee, Rhapsody in Black and White, 2008, ink jet on Dibond, 60 x 118 x 4".

Over the past few years, Detroit icon Charles McGee has become one of the public faces of a resurgent Motor City. McGee, now ninety-two, has been painting large-scale, black-and-white murals and installing sculptures throughout his hometown since the 1970s, but these works have recently begun to appear more frequently and prominently. McGee’s biomorphic polka-dotted and striped sculpture of a group of dancing figures, United We Stand, 2016, greets visitors at the entrance of the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. His similarly vibrant eleven-story mural, Unity, 2017, a dynamic composition of schematic human, animal, insect, and reptile forms, appears on the side of 28 Grand, a brand-new mixed-income apartment building that recently opened in the city’s Capitol Park neighborhood. Playing between abstraction and realism, McGee’s public works evoke a sundry range

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