new-york

Vivan Suter, Untitled, 2017, oil and pigment on canvas. Installation view. Photo: Bill Orcutt.

Hudinilson Jr., Jessica Mein, Vivian Suter

Simon Preston

Vivan Suter, Untitled, 2017, oil and pigment on canvas. Installation view. Photo: Bill Orcutt.

The original 1938 Xerox machine transferred images from one surface to another using a six-step electrographic process that required fixing a negatively charged powder to a positively charged piece of paper. That powder, today known as toner, is adhered with heat and was originally made of moss spores.

Like that of photography, the advent of xerography (“dry writing”) had far-reaching repercussions, unsurprisingly facilitating office productivity but also precipitating government leaks and aids activism. Advertisers soon took up the technique, as did artists. In America, Pati Hill was perhaps the most prominent pioneer; in Brazil, it may have been Hudinilson Jr. At Simon Preston Gallery, for Condo New York—a cooperative project that brought artworks from twenty international galleries to host spaces in the city this past July—works by Hudinilson Jr. (from Jacqueline

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