new-york

Liz Glynn, Open House, 2017, cast concrete. Installation view. Photo: James Ewing.

Liz Glynn

Public Art Fund | Doris C. Freedman Plaza

Liz Glynn, Open House, 2017, cast concrete. Installation view. Photo: James Ewing.

The William C. Whitney House used to stand at the corner of Fifth Avenue and Sixty-Eighth Street, but like a lot of things in New York, it was torn down to make way for the future. (A large apartment complex occupies the site today.) For her project some ten blocks south, at Doris C. Freedman Plaza, Los Angeles–based artist Liz Glynn has re-created portions of the lost building’s Stanford White–designed interiors out of concrete. Using photographic documentation as a kind of negative, Glynn cast a suite of armchairs and settees and sofas, as well as entryways and porticos, which gave the project a permeable edge. (The way these ornate passageways framed hot dog stands and honking Ubers provided the work a good portion of its frisson.) It was a sort of living room for the city, a hardened version of the domestic. The artist titled the work Open House. Call it Plaza brut.

There is

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the October 2017 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.