reviews

Tim Youd, Philip K. Dick’s A Scanner Darkly, 2013, typewriter ink on paper, 17x25".

Tim Youd

Christin Tierney

Tim Youd, Philip K. Dick’s A Scanner Darkly, 2013, typewriter ink on paper, 17x25".

In Stanley Kubrick’s much-deconstructed ur-horror film The Shining (1980), conclusive evidence of protagonist Jack Torrance’s psychopathy appears tucked into the wayward winter caretaker’s typewriter. Upon finding it, his long-suffering wife, Wendy, begins to page through a stack of similar typewritten pages nearby. To her despair, she finds the sheaf of papers previously assumed to contain Torrance’s novel in progress to contain endless repetitions of the same self-mocking maxim: “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy.” The phrase is typed in a variety of decorative configurations, as if the writer were struggling to keep himself entertained through a necessary chore, or perhaps tamp down his mania via a peculiar sort of self-flagellation or therapy. The scene is made all the creepier by its economy, a few inert bits of paper and a familiar saying signaling an irreversible

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