rio-de-janeiro

Carlos Zilio, Tamanduá e o cosmos, 2017, oil and spray paint on canvas, 53 1/8 x 78 3/4".

Carlos Zilio

Anita Schwartz Galeria | Rio de Janeiro

Carlos Zilio, Tamanduá e o cosmos, 2017, oil and spray paint on canvas, 53 1/8 x 78 3/4".

Carlos Zilio began his career in the mid-1960s, when Brazil was undergoing the trauma of dictatorship. His production has always addressed the political dimension of art through a powerful critical reading of reality; throughout his career, his works have continued to reflect a fragmented world, pitiless and constantly in conflict.

Zilio’s recent exhibition brought together paintings using the motif of the Tamandua, a genus of anteater, and objects reflecting on the theme of the artist’s atelier. The tamandua is not a new image in his work. It emerged following the death of his father in 1985, as the evocation of a family story that seems almost like a fable: The elder Zilio would recount the story of an anteater that he’d tamed and that would follow him around, until it died falling down a staircase. In 2008, the motif became a prominent part of Zilio’s oeuvre after he noticed a

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