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Tom Wesselmann, Still Life #48, 1964, acrylic, collage, and assemblage on board, 48 x 60 x 8". From “Deadeye Dick: Richard Bellamy and His Circle.” © The Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York.

“Deadeye Dick: Richard Bellamy and His Circle”

Peter Freeman, Inc.

Tom Wesselmann, Still Life #48, 1964, acrylic, collage, and assemblage on board, 48 x 60 x 8". From “Deadeye Dick: Richard Bellamy and His Circle.” © The Estate of Tom Wesselmann/Licensed by VAGA, New York.

Richard Bellamy (1927–1998), aka Deadeye Dick, was among the significant figures of his generation, credited with identifying and exhibiting both Pop artists and Minimalists early on. Anyone who’s old enough to have visited galleries Bellamy directed, be it the Green Gallery or Oil & Steel, remembers his perspicacity, catholic taste, youthful exuberance, and gift for installing art to maximum effect. After his death almost twenty years ago at the age of seventy, his reputation dropped off the radar of a younger generation.

With the publication last year of Eye of the Sixties: Richard Bellamy and the Transformation of Modern Art, Judith Stein’s superbly researched and well-written biography, Bellamy has returned to the limelight. And this exhibition, “Deadeye Dick: Richard Bellamy and His Circle,” which Stein curated, could not have illuminated better what set this dealer apart from

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