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Martha Tuttle, Weather (7), 2017, wool, silk, dye, pigment, steel, 40 x 63 3/4".

Martha Tuttle and Henry Chapman

Rhona Hoffman Gallery

Martha Tuttle, Weather (7), 2017, wool, silk, dye, pigment, steel, 40 x 63 3/4".

Martha Tuttle and Henry Chapman have long shared a poetic appreciation of painting and a fondness for geometric abstraction, in particular that of Agnes Martin’s canvases. The two artists—who were colleagues in graduate school at Yale University and subsequently studio mates in Queens but now live on opposite coasts (Chapman in Berkeley, California, and Tuttle in New York)—were reunited at Rhona Hoffman this past summer. The exhibition showcased their intense personal dialogue by examining a group of 2017 paintings that favor order and the formalist principles of wholes and repetition over fragmentation, discontinuity, and dissonance. Foremost comprising patterns, shapes, and arrangements, these works collectively strove to stabilize material differences and establish well-wrought unity, while individual paintings simultaneously conveyed restraint and singular invention.

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