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Trevor Paglen, A Prison Without Guards (Corpus: Eye-Machines), 2017, dye sublimation print, 32 x 40". From the series “Adversarially Evolved Hallucination,” 2017.

Trevor Paglen

Metro Pictures

Trevor Paglen, A Prison Without Guards (Corpus: Eye-Machines), 2017, dye sublimation print, 32 x 40". From the series “Adversarially Evolved Hallucination,” 2017.

Back to school: Trevor Paglen produced his important early work on military black sites and extraordinary rendition while pursuing a doctorate in geography at the University of California, Berkeley. Having already received his MFA, he drew on geography’s analytic tools to develop an artistic practice premised on the hunch that, however “secret,” clandestine government programs would always leave material traces—facilities, flight records, post office boxes—that could be located, documented, and made visible to a broader public. This year, Paglen spent several months as an artist-in-residence at Stanford University, collaborating with computer scientists to explore how computers are being trained to “see” images without human intervention.

Machine vision figures prominently in military technology, aspects of which were detailed in videos by the late Harun Farocki. For his

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