new-york

Anna Maria Maiolino, In-Out Antropofagia (In-Out Anthropophagy), 1973–74, Super-8 film transferred to DVD, black-and-white, sound, 8 minutes 14 seconds.

“Delirious: Art at the Limits of Reason, 1950–1980”

The Met Breuer

Anna Maria Maiolino, In-Out Antropofagia (In-Out Anthropophagy), 1973–74, Super-8 film transferred to DVD, black-and-white, sound, 8 minutes 14 seconds.

Much ink has been spilled on Jacques Derrida’s passionate exchange with Michel Foucault around the latter’s publication of Folie et déraison: Histoire de la folie à l’âge classique (Madness and Civilization: A History of Insanity in the Age of Reason) in 1961. I would like to recall that the primary issue for Derrida was not that madness was expulsed during the Classical Age, but that madness is always already internal to reason. A similar claim informs this compelling postwar survey of international art, but it does so by focusing on the procedures immanent to the artwork on display, while holding delirium as a clinical condition at bay. In the sections “Vertigo” and “Excess,” one tracks how curator Kelly Baum’s selection of seemingly logical aesthetic devices such as the grid, geometric abstraction, and seriality is in fact a harbinger of the opposite. Baum introduces viewers

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the December 2017 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.