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Kara Walker, Christ’s Entry into Journalism, 2017, sumi ink and collage on paper, 11' 8“ x 16' 4”.

Kara Walker

Sikkema Jenkins & Co.

Kara Walker, Christ’s Entry into Journalism, 2017, sumi ink and collage on paper, 11' 8“ x 16' 4”.

Kara Walker made all of the works for her September show at Sikkema Jenkins & Co. this past summer. She offers this information as a kind of afterthought, along with a dry, technical description of her awesome, stomach-turning output (“This is a show of works on paper and on linen, drawn and collaged using ink, blade, glue, and oil stick”) in the concluding paragraph of her accompanying statement. The text, save for its matter-of-fact ending, is an artful paroxysm of frustration and despair. Walker, an African American woman artist, who has for decades merged historical fact and fable to depict surreal, often pornographic scenes of the transatlantic slave trade and the antebellum South—drawing upon a pernicious American lexicon of caricature to do so—is tired now, she writes, “of standing up, being counted, tired of ‘having a voice’ or worse ‘being a role model.’” It’s

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