reviews

  • Pablo Rasgado, This Too Shall Pass, 2017, copper, 3/4 x 3/4".

    Pablo Rasgado

    Steve Turner

    Walls have been a recurring motif in the works of Mexico City–based artist Pablo Rasgado. In his ongoing “Extractions” series, 2006–, Rasgado produces found paintings by lifting off sections of splattered, graffitied, or scuffed walls in outdoor urban spaces using a centuries-old fresco restoration technique called strappo. Unlike other artists who have also taken surfaces found in the streets as subject matter—for example, Brassaï, who made uncanny photographs of scratched drawings and pockmarked surfaces in the streets of midcentury Paris—Rasgado extracts physical segments of facades,

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  • George Egerton-Warburton, The bus metaphor, 2017, ink-jet print, dirt, oak, paper, glass, 16 x 20 x 2".

    George Egerton-Warburton

    Artist Curated Projects

    For “The weapon soup boils over, as stocks in metaphors plummet,” George Egerton-Warburton’s first solo show in Los Angeles, the Australian artist showed three kinetic sculptures—Sisyphean motors powering nothing—and a suite of photographs from 2017. He pasted text on each of the images and ensconced the collages in crudely assembled shadow boxes, into which he deposited desiccated California soil. The photos comprise groupings of bucolic sheep, mobs grazing in the landscape of remote Western Australia. Taken in 2013 by Egerton-Warburton’s father on his farm upon the artist’s request,

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  • Elizabeth Axtman, Run Nigga, Run, 2017, acrylic and collage on paper, 18 x 26".

    Elizabeth Axtman

    Residency Art Gallery

    In her 2003 essay “Pimp Notes on Autonomy,” Beth Coleman writes, “The fame of black people . . . is a fame based on the foresight that race does not exist anymore, which does not necessarily make a body right.” O. J. Simpson’s infamous claim, “I’m not black, I’m O. J.,” could be read as a similar assertion, a cultivated self-definition of Simpson as a public figure pointedly outside of racial politics. But after the former NFL running back’s dramatic fugitive flight, “trial of the century,” and murder acquittal, he would never again be exempt from race in America (as if such an idea was possible).

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