new-york

Rosalyn Drexler, Ana Falling (Was She Pushed?), 1989, acrylic and collage on canvas, 80 x 40". © Rosalyn
Drexler/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Rosalyn Drexler

Garth Greenan Gallery

Rosalyn Drexler, Ana Falling (Was She Pushed?), 1989, acrylic and collage on canvas, 80 x 40". © Rosalyn
Drexler/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Portrait of the Artist, 1989, finds Rosalyn Drexler crouched against a black rectangular background in a suit and tie. She wears a wrestling cap and a colorful mask; a toy airplane grazes her head and one manicured hand, in a fingerless glove, covers her mouth. In her other gloved hand she holds a paintbrush the way Holly Golightly held a cigarette. Out of the brush, a cloud of pointillist color flows, surrounding the framed artist like the confetti borders in many of Georges Seurat’s compositions. She is defined by art-historical reference but not contained by it.

At once revealing and elusive, this arresting image of creative selfhood in process is a kind of allegory for the entire show. Each of its eleven canvases included at least one character (its face masked or partially obscured) conjured from art, news, or Drexler’s own rich personal life, encouraging the viewer to parse

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the December 2017 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.