reviews

Wang Gongxin, Dialogue, 1995, metal, wood, ink, motor, lightbulbs. Installation view, 2017. Photo: Kit Min Lee.

Wang Gongxin

White Cube | Hong Kong

Wang Gongxin, Dialogue, 1995, metal, wood, ink, motor, lightbulbs. Installation view, 2017. Photo: Kit Min Lee.

Now one of the most important video artists in China, Wang Gongxin was largely an outsider in relation to the country’s avant-garde movement in the mid-1980s. As an outstanding student in Soviet realism–style oil painting, in 1987 he was sent to New York—a space-time drastically different from China, culturally and aesthetically, and already deep in postmodernism—to further his art studies. At first shocked by the art practices on the other side of the earth, Wang slowly shifted his painting to a more minimal and conceptual mode in the late 1980s. In 1993, he combined his new works with elements from painting, concepts of daily life, and a newfound ambition to deconstruct.

For “Rotation,” his new solo exhibition, Wang took a group of previously undiscovered kinetic installations, conceived in the mid-1990s as a departure from his earlier practices, to review and revisualize

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the December 2017 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.