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Judy Chicago, Morning Fan, 1971, sprayed acrylic on acrylic, 60 × 120".

Judy Chicago

Jessica Silverman Gallery

Judy Chicago, Morning Fan, 1971, sprayed acrylic on acrylic, 60 × 120".

“Pussies,” Judy Chicago’s first solo exhibition in San Francisco since her iconic installation The Dinner Party premiered there in 1979, presented paintings, drawings, and ceramic plates made between 1968 and 2004, many of which exemplified the feminist art practices pioneered by the artist in the 1960s and ’70s. The show felt timely not only because it occurred during a time of ongoing legalized sexism in the United States, but also because it was staged in the wake of recent allegations of sexual harassment leveled against powerful men across cultural spheres (including at this magazine)—making it clear that the fight for gender equality waged by Chicago’s generation is far from over. Yet the careful, quiet selection of works also offered viewers an opportunity to reassess the profound formal strength and significance of Chicago’s practice—a fuller understanding of

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