philadelphia

Catherine Jansen, Sewing Space, 1981, thread, embroidery, xerography on cloth. Installation view. From “Making /Breaking the Binary: Women, Art & Technology (1968–1985).” Photo: Gideon Barnett.

“Making/Breaking the Binary: Women, Art, and Technology (1968–1985)”

Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery

Catherine Jansen, Sewing Space, 1981, thread, embroidery, xerography on cloth. Installation view. From “Making /Breaking the Binary: Women, Art & Technology (1968–1985).” Photo: Gideon Barnett.

Spanning from the year of the groundbreaking “The Machine as Seen at the End of the Mechanical Age” at the Museum of Modern Art in New York to the dawn of the personal-computing era, “Making/Breaking the Binary: Women, Art & Technology” at the University of the Arts’ Rosenwald-Wolf Gallery presented pieces by twenty-two female artists and composers who were inspired by modern media. A prominent figure featured was Beryl Korot, who is known for her work in both video and weaving. She has linked the latter practice to computing by describing the loom as a proto-computer, in that it follows preordained patterns to interlace threads in elaborate, linear configurations. Following Korot’s lead, curator Kelsey Halliday Johnson here suggested that practices traditionally denigrated as “women’s work” share formal and functional qualities with technological inventions of the past half

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