reviews

Pascal Convert, Falaise de Bâmiyân (Bamiyan’s Cliffs) (detail), 2017, fifteen platinum palladium prints, each 65 3/8 × 43 1/4".

Pascal Convert

Galerie Eric Dupont

Pascal Convert, Falaise de Bâmiyân (Bamiyan’s Cliffs) (detail), 2017, fifteen platinum palladium prints, each 65 3/8 × 43 1/4".

In March 2016, the French ambassador to Afghanistan invited Pascal Convert to the city of Bamiyan, site of the destruction of the great Buddha sculptures fifteen years earlier—six months before the attack on the Twin Towers. In deploying dynamite against these monumental statues, Taliban leader Mullah Mohammed Omar did not only desecrate religious idols, he also attacked the cultural patrimony of Afghanistan. Though Bamiyan—long a crossroads of Zoroastrianism, Islam, and Buddhism on the Silk Road—has not been a site of pilgrimage or worship for centuries, and though there are no longer Buddhists in the country, these objects were important monuments of Afghan art and history. The Taliban made a film of the destruction, a document that points to the paradox of the iconoclasts, who are as conscious as any artist of the power of images. The 2002 exhibition “Iconoclash:

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the January 2018 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.