los-angeles

Ana Mendieta, Untitled (Facial Hair Transplants) (detail), 1972, seven C-prints, each 13 1/4 × 20".

Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985”

Hammer Museum

Ana Mendieta, Untitled (Facial Hair Transplants) (detail), 1972, seven C-prints, each 13 1/4 × 20".

ONE OF EIGHTY-SOME EXHIBITIONS in the Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative, “Radical Women: Latin American Art, 1960–1985” explicitly endeavored, as curators Cecilia Fajardo-Hill and Andrea Giunta put it, “to write a new chapter in twentieth-century art history” by correcting the field’s long-standing obfuscation of women artists’ contributions. On this count, “Radical Women” was a triumph, introducing dozens of neglected artists (including some from such rarely represented nations as Panama, Paraguay, and Costa Rica) to new audiences. It was more a feminist curatorial intervention than a survey of “Latin American feminist art,” which, the curators note, never manifested as a pan-regional movement. “Most of the artists featured in this exhibition did not set out to make feminist works,” Fajardo-Hill and Giunta write in the catalogue, “even though we, as

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