reviews

View of “Raphaël Zarka,” 2017. Photo: Florian Kleinefenn.

Raphaël Zarka

Michel Rein | Paris

View of “Raphaël Zarka,” 2017. Photo: Florian Kleinefenn.

For the past decade, Raphaël Zarka’s work has prominently featured images of skateboarders taking advantage of the slick surfaces, hard edges, and smooth slopes of monumental public artworks. For the series “Riding Modern Art,” 2007–, Zarka, himself a skater, compiled an impressive portfolio of video clips and still photographs that show sculptures by the likes of Pablo Picasso and Richard Serra serving as improvised ramps and illicit half-pipes. Similarly irreverent, the artist’s recent exhibition, “Monte Oliveto,” also raised questions about the relationship between form and function. Commingling artistic and scientific references, Zarka’s new sculptures, drawings, and collages advocate the utility of forms that are ostensibly purely aesthetic and, conversely, emphasize the aesthetic value of useful objects.

The centerpiece of the exhibition was Partition régulière W8M1 (Regular

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the January 2018 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.