Tom Hammick, Sky Atlas, 2017, reduction woodcut, 80 3/4 x 47 3/4".

Tom Hammick

Flowers Gallery

Tom Hammick, Sky Atlas, 2017, reduction woodcut, 80 3/4 x 47 3/4".

In a series of seventeen exquisitely crafted, visionary woodcuts (all works 2017), Tom Hammick took us on a “Lunar Voyage”—that is, on an artistic adventure to the moon. As French scholars Jean Chevalier and Alain Gheerbrant wrote in their 1969 Dictionary of Symbols, the moon is “a cosmic symbol throughout every age, from time immemorial to the present, and common to every culture,” as well as an emblem of “dreams and the Unconscious as properties of darkness.” Darkness abounds in Hammick’s dreamscapes, most prominently in Blackout, with its sweeping night sky and solitary figure, whose opaque silhouette is imprinted on the lesser blackness of the moonless sky, where a sprinkling of stars adds touches of light. It is an image of mute despair and reverent awe, the anonymous human figure humbled by the infinite sky, almost disappearing into the oblivion.

All of Hammick’s

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