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Jacques Henri Lartigue, Feu d’artifice à Nice (Fireworks in Nice), 1911, gelatin silver print, 15 3/4 × 11 3/4". © Ministère de la Culture–France/AAJHL.

École(S) de Nice

Various Venues

Jacques Henri Lartigue, Feu d’artifice à Nice (Fireworks in Nice), 1911, gelatin silver print, 15 3/4 × 11 3/4". © Ministère de la Culture–France/AAJHL.

IN 1961, Yves Klein, one of Nice’s most famous sons, heralded the coastal metropolis’s significance in a global art landscape. Delivering a prescient conjecture about our present moment, the artist who had notoriously “signed” the azure sky of Nice as his first artwork announced: “I see a new art axis: Nice–Los Angeles–Tokyo; we will be joined by China.”

More than fifty years after this pronouncement, and only a year and a half after the Bastille Day terrorist attack on the city’s iconic Promenade des Anglais, Klein’s hometown staged an ambitious series of exhibitions across four separate venues, highlighting its history as a fertile cultural and artistic hub since the Paleolithic era, when early humans domesticated fire at Terra Amata. Collectively titled “École(S) de Nice” (School[S] of Nice), the endeavors together offered a significant case study of locality and its

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