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Gilberto Zorio, Piombi II (Lead II), 1968, lead sheets, copper sulfate, hydrochloric acid, fluorescein, copper braid, rope. Installation view, 2017. Photo: Antonio Maniscalco.

Gilberto Zorio

Castelo di Rivoli

Gilberto Zorio, Piombi II (Lead II), 1968, lead sheets, copper sulfate, hydrochloric acid, fluorescein, copper braid, rope. Installation view, 2017. Photo: Antonio Maniscalco.

NEITHER AN ARTWORK nor the career of an artist is a fixed entity. This is the ultimate takeaway from the retrospective at Turin, Italy’s Castello di Rivoli of sculptor Gilberto Zorio’s work, which consists of energetic ideas and objects that have shifted, grown, and intertwined over his five-decade career. The Italian artist is something of a hometown hero, having resided in the neighboring metropolis of Turin since graduating from its Accademia Albertina di Belle Arti in the 1960s. This local renown, however, belies his importance to international artistic discourse. From his early days (when he was part of the stable of young artists who showed with Gian Enzo Sperone and whose work was christened Arte Povera by Germano Celant), Zorio has continued to invent works that transform the very concept of sculpture from something heavy, stable, and still to something light, unpredictable,

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