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Frederick Hammersley, JELLY CENTERS, #31, 1969, computergenerated drawing on paper, 11 x 15". © Frederick Hammersley Foundation.

Frederick Hammersley

The Huntington

Frederick Hammersley, JELLY CENTERS, #31, 1969, computergenerated drawing on paper, 11 x 15". © Frederick Hammersley Foundation.

Frederick Hammersley epitomizes hard-edge midcentury Los Angeles painting, his reputation having been established in Jules Langsner’s legendary 1959 show “Four Abstract Classicists.” Hammersley lived in LA until 1968, when he moved to Albuquerque, New Mexico. The following year he learned Art1, a new computer program written for artists by Katherine Nash and Richard Williams at the University of New Mexico. Hammersley used the program—entering designs in early IBM computers via punch cards—to make what he dubbed “computer drawings,” which were realized with line printers. Often consisting of series of ovals and dots, these printouts were appended with the artist’s typically spirited titles (e.g., SLEEPING PILL IT’S NOT, #27, 1969, for a stack of wavy lines composed of dots). These works are a revelation and reason enough for justifying the recent show of some fifty

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