mumbai

L. N. Tallur, HaloX Body—Two, 2017, bronze, concrete, iron, 64 x 20 5/8 x 36".

L. N. Tallur

Chemould Prescott Road

L. N. Tallur, HaloX Body—Two, 2017, bronze, concrete, iron, 64 x 20 5/8 x 36".

Ancient and contemporary, traditional and modern conflate in L. N. Tallur’s sculptures, making them historically ambiguous, unbounded by time. Trained in museology, Tallur seems to be particularly concerned with issues of age, provenance, and authenticity as well as with the museum as a site of cultural and evolutionary taxonomy and with its inherent politics of representation.

In his essay “On the Annals of the Laboratory State” (1988), sociologist Shiv Visvanathan talks about how the time of modernity became the time of the world. In it, he describes how the cyclical theory of time of the medieval period, which permitted “decadence and reversal,” eventually gave way to a “linear, irreversible notion of time.” By resisting this linearity, Tallur seems to be challenging not just this Eurocentric temporality of modernity but also the logic of capitalism and globalization. He does

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