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Sanya Kantarovsky, Letdown, 2017, oil, watercolor, and pastel on canvas, 85 x 65".

Sanya Kantarovsky

Fondazione Sandretto Re Rebaudengo

Sanya Kantarovsky, Letdown, 2017, oil, watercolor, and pastel on canvas, 85 x 65".

Amid the public displays of penitence in the #MeToo era, the knee-jerk qualifier “as a father” has been particularly maligned for its implication that parenthood is somehow a prerequisite for possessing respect for human dignity. At the same time, there is a specific torment to being a parent in a moment when the monsters under the bed have been revealed as more than just shadows, and the helplessness of the child is openly matched by that of the parents, who can never fully shield their offspring against the abuses rampant in the world.

Sanya Kantarovsky mined this double vulnerability in his gut-wrenching solo presentation “Letdown.” The New York–based painter has developed a signature style that recuperates the visual vocabulary of Soviet satire as a formal device, endowing his figures with the laconic features and Plasticine anatomies one might have encountered in the pages of

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