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Tsubasa Kato, Black Snake, 2017, digital C-print, 17 3/4 x 24 5/8".

Tsubasa Kato

Mujin-to Production

Tsubasa Kato, Black Snake, 2017, digital C-print, 17 3/4 x 24 5/8".

Tsubasa Kato’s work is typically described in the terms of socially engaged and community arts. This framing befits his iconic “Pull and Raise” series, 2007–, for which the artist recruited people to erect or topple symbolic architectural structures, including apartment rooms and a tsunami-destroyed lighthouse, with ropes and festive cheers. To some extent, it also applies to “(Drawing) Fractions of the Longest Distance,” his recent exhibition in two successive parts, which featured video documentation and performance artifacts from nine projects conducted between 2015 and 2017. Black Snake, 2017, for example—the most recent of several projects carried out at the Standing Rock Indian Reservation in North Dakota since 2013—documents locals overturning a giant three-dimensional wooden grid. Plastic sheeting had been woven through the structure so that it resembled a black

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