tallinn-estonia

Katja Novitskova, Pattern of Activation (mamaRoo Nursery and Dawn Chorus), 2017, electronic baby swings, aluminum folding stands, lasers, digital print, robotic bugs, Swarovski crystals, stress pills, silicone stress eggs, acrylic massagers, animal-patterned stickers, fossils, tree mushrooms, video projection, and mixed media. Installation view. Photo: Tõnu Tunnel.

Katja Novitskova

Art Museum of Estonia | Kumu

Katja Novitskova, Pattern of Activation (mamaRoo Nursery and Dawn Chorus), 2017, electronic baby swings, aluminum folding stands, lasers, digital print, robotic bugs, Swarovski crystals, stress pills, silicone stress eggs, acrylic massagers, animal-patterned stickers, fossils, tree mushrooms, video projection, and mixed media. Installation view. Photo: Tõnu Tunnel.

“If Only You Could See What I’ve Seen with Your Eyes. Stage 2.” is the first major institutional solo exhibition of Estonian artist Katja Novitskova in her home country. The show takes its title from a conversation between the replicant Roy Batty and designer and engineer Hannibal Chew in Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner (1982); machine vision is at the core of its thematic constellation. Originally created for and presented in the compact Estonian pavilion at last year’s Venice Biennale, the project has become more extensive and breathes more freely in nine spaces of the Kumu Art Museum. Walking from room to room is like roaming through a natural-history or science museum, although the distinction between nature and science becomes moot: There is no longer such a thing as a natural environment, because everything has been subject to scientific and technological manipulation.

Each room

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