new-york

Kishio Suga, Nature of Elapsing Sites, 2017, wood, paint, stones, 71 7/8 x 54 3/8 x 3 1/2".

Kishio Suga

Blum & Poe | New York

Kishio Suga, Nature of Elapsing Sites, 2017, wood, paint, stones, 71 7/8 x 54 3/8 x 3 1/2".

“I constantly think about how to confuse or distort the typical order of things,” artist Kishio Suga wrote for a 2005 essay anthologized in Kishio Suga’s Work from a Zen Perspective (2008). “Viewers would be rendered speechless before an artwork of this kind. In a matter of seconds or minutes, their thoughts would shift from established orders to new ones.” One might expect such an endeavor to require the use of jarring force or violence—anything other than the sanguine grace that permeated Suga’s latest show at Blum & Poe. But like an expert tour guide, Suga led the way down various side streets of abstraction that had thus far gone unexplored, and left one wondering how other artists had managed to pass them by.

The practices of Suga and other Mono-haartists famously evolved in indirect correlation with 1960s Minimalist and post-Minimalist movements outside of Japan, and

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