new-york

Moyra Davey, 1943 (detail), 2018, 108 C-prints, tape, postage, ink, each print 18 x 12".

Moyra Davey

Galerie Buchholz | New York

Moyra Davey, 1943 (detail), 2018, 108 C-prints, tape, postage, ink, each print 18 x 12".

The only coin ever made in the United States that can be picked up with a magnet is the 1943 steel cent. It was produced in a time of austerity at the height of World War II, when copper was being rerouted to munitions manufacturing. Steel pennies coated in zinc may have conserved necessary metal, but they caused all kinds of problems, too. They were unusually light. They were often mistaken for dimes. They got stuck in vending machines. They rusted quickly. A few years ago, someone gave the artist Moyra Davey a whole cache of them as a gift. They had aged weirdly and unevenly, having become by turns gray and red and flecked with rust, craggy and smooth and corroded by time. Earlier this year, Davey began to photograph these pennies—seemingly accidental portraits of Abraham Lincoln—and print them on her now signature aerograms, which she mailed in succession to the staff

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