london

Aslan Gaisumov, Keicheyuhea, 2017, HD video, color, sound, 26 minutes.

Aslan Gaisumov

Emalin

Aslan Gaisumov, Keicheyuhea, 2017, HD video, color, sound, 26 minutes.

“Truth” and “reconciliation” do not always go together. The imperative to testify—particularly in instances of collective trauma—is presumed to outweigh any costs, emotional, psychological, or even legal. But who really has the right to demand those truths? To whom do they belong? For whose benefit are they shared? And to whose detriment? In his films and objects, Aslan Gaisumov walks the line between silence and articulation. Born in the Chechen capital of Grozny, he creates work that not only revisits the devastation of the recent conflicts, but also traces them back to their roots in the forced migration of the Chechen and Ingush peoples to other parts of the USSR in the 1940s, purportedly the largest and most brutal deportation in Soviet history.

In late February 1944, as part of Stalin’s resettlement campaign, residents of Chechnya and Ingushetia—two neighboring

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the Summer 2018 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.