london

Bice Lazzari, Multigrafia e nero (Multigraphy and Black), 1972, acrylic on canvas, 56 3/4 x 76 1/8".

Bice Lazzari

SOTHEBY’S S|2 GALLERY

Bice Lazzari, Multigrafia e nero (Multigraphy and Black), 1972, acrylic on canvas, 56 3/4 x 76 1/8".

Those who appreciate the art of Nasreen Mohamedi or Agnes Martin—artists whose pursuit of simplicity led them to probe the endless vibrations of space rather than the construction of form—might want to start looking into the work of Bice Lazzari, yet another of the seemingly endless number of underrecognized women modernists whose work is ripe for reconsideration. Born in Venice in 1900 and trained as a figurative painter, she began working abstractly in the late 1920s, first as a practitioner of the applied arts—fabric designs, decorative panels, and the like—but her abstract drawings from this period stand as fully autonomous works. It was only in the postwar period (by which time she had moved to Rome) that Lazzari really came into her own as an abstract painter—but with two decades of experience in the basics of line, form, and color to rely on.

Lazzari’s

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