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Erwin Blumenfeld, Vogue Paris, Eiffel Tower, May 1939, gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 8 3/4". © The Estate of Erwin Blumenfeld.

Erwin Blumenfeld

Edwynn Houk Gallery | New York

Erwin Blumenfeld, Vogue Paris, Eiffel Tower, May 1939, gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 8 3/4". © The Estate of Erwin Blumenfeld.

Vogue Paris, Eiffel Tower, May 1939 is Erwin Blumenfeld’s most famous fashion photograph. After moving to New York in 1941 to escape the Nazis, the German-born photographer contributed extensively, and for decades, to an international array of Condé Nast publications including Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar. The model in the aforementioned image, dressed in a glorious white gown billowing like the wings of an angel or a dove, evokes the famous Hellenistic sculpture Winged Victory of Samothrace, which resides on a staircase in the Louvre in Paris. Blumenfeld’s female figure reflects a singular historical importance and poignancy, as the symbol of a defiant Paris, which held her own before falling to the German army in June of the following year. The photographer’s elegantly clothed model—a haute bourgeois figure, slim and self-possessed—also has a certain affinity with

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