reviews

Fabien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni, 1922—The Uncomputable, 2016, HD video, color, sound, 26 minutes.

Fabien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni

Casino Luxembourg

Fabien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni, 1922—The Uncomputable, 2016, HD video, color, sound, 26 minutes.

Art history regularly yields works that are worlds unto themselves, that demand time of the viewer and can only be understood properly from an oblique perspective, from a precise viewpoint, performing something like a temporal rather than a spatial anamorphosis. Among these is Fabien Giraud and Raphaël Siboni’s series “The Unnamed,” 2014–, an epic tracing the world’s gradual algorithmization, which debuted at the Casino Luxembourg in January and will subsequently travel to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Fondation d’Entreprise Ricard in Paris, the Museum of Old and New Art in Hobart, Tasmania; and the Galerie de l’Université du Québec à Montréal. While the content of the introduction and seven episodes of the work’s first “season” is too vast to be detailed here, suffice it to say that it tracks a few of the major key dates in the packed history of computer science.

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the Summer 2018 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.