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Lasar Segall, Eternos caminhantes (Eternal Walkers), 1919, oil on canvas, 54 3/8 x 72 1/2".

Lasar Segall

Museu Lasar Segall

Lasar Segall, Eternos caminhantes (Eternal Walkers), 1919, oil on canvas, 54 3/8 x 72 1/2".

Recent Hollywood films such as The Monuments Men (2014) have dramatized the Nazis’ confiscation of modern art and its postwar recovery. Among the artists whose work had been confiscated was the Brazilian painter Lasar Segall. The notorious exhibition “Entartete Kunst” (Degenerate Art), inaugurated in Munich in 1937, targeted modern art through various didactic slogans, including “Nature as seen by sick minds,” and declared the diseased origins of the art on display. That exhibition included eleven works by Segall—selected from among nearly fifty that were confiscated by the Nazis after having been collected by German museums during the Weimar period. “A ‘arte degenerada’ de Lasar Segall: Perseguição à arte moderna em tempos de guerra” (The Degenerate Art of Lasar Segall: Persecution of Modern Art in Times of War) explores a related history, but one left out of such films and

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