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View of “Máquinas de vivir. Flamenco y arquitectura en la ocupación y desocupación de espacios” (Machines for Living: Flamenco and Architecture in the Occupation and Vacating of Spaces), 2018. Photo: Pep Herrero.

“Machines for Living”

La Virreina Centre de la Imatge

View of “Máquinas de vivir. Flamenco y arquitectura en la ocupación y desocupación de espacios” (Machines for Living: Flamenco and Architecture in the Occupation and Vacating of Spaces), 2018. Photo: Pep Herrero.

In Spain in the late 1950s, once the cataclysm of World War II had been overcome and order was restored under a welfare model, a turn away from the traditional criticism of political economy to a critique of everyday life became imperative. The focus was no longer on the exploitation of the workforce. Rather, diffuse opinions started to penetrate the quotidian through a promotion of life models and consumption, offered like a threshold for happiness. It was this context that birthed the terms spatial turn and performative turn. The first appealed to Henri Lefebvre’s idea of the importance of lived space, as opposed to those spaces regulated by architecture and urbanism; the second leveraged sociologist Erving Goffman’s analysis of social interactions to create a dramaturgy based on parsing different modes of production through the space-making capacity of performative practices.

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