johannesburg

David Goldblatt, ‘Boss Boy’ detail, Battery Reef, Randfontein Estates Gold Mine, 1966, carbon ink on paper, 14 3⁄8 × 11 3⁄4".

David Goldblatt and Peter Magubane

Goodman Gallery | Johannesburg

This was long slated to be David Goldblatt’s year: He was the subject of a career-defining retrospective at the Centre Pompidou in Paris in the spring and of a biographical documentary at the Durban International Film Festival in South Africa in July, and he featured in the inaugural group show of the A4 Arts Foundation near Cape Town in September. The anticipation surrounding these appearances gained new poignancy this past June, when the South African photographer died at the age of eighty-seven. While “On Common Ground: David Goldblatt and Peter Magubane,” was a fitting tribute, it also marked a crucial bridging of two worlds, drawing together as it did two legends of apartheid-era imagemaking. As quintessential Johannesburgers, Goldblatt, white and working in the “typological” mode of Bernd and Hilla Becher, and Magubane, a black photojournalist, shared a broad social and political

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