Los Angeles

Lucy Raven, Curtains, 2014, anaglyph video installation, color, sound, 50 minutes. From “3D: Double Vision.”

“3D: Double Vision”

Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA)

Lucy Raven, Curtains, 2014, anaglyph video installation, color, sound, 50 minutes. From “3D: Double Vision.”

The mechanics of binocular vision—the method by which a single three-dimensional image emerges from the brain’s synthesis of two perceiving eyes—subtend human perception. In the 1830s, the process was, in effect, operationalized with the invention of the stereoscope, in which technological means were employed to harness biology in the service of illusionism (within the same decade, Louis Daguerre’s camera likewise debuted). “3D: Double Vision” is apparently the first survey of this nearly two-hundred-year history of 3-D objects and their apparatuses to be shown in a North American art museum. More than a succession of novelties, the exhibition underlines the continued, self-conscious efforts of scientists, engineers, artists, and filmmakers to understand how the world appears to human eyes. Indeed, if anything, curator Britt Salvesen labored to maintain the seriousness

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