Jaipur

Jacques Kaufmann, To Purify Space, 2018, brick, bamboo, fired clay, mirrors, 11' 9 3⁄4“ × 9' 10 1⁄8” × 9' 10 1⁄8". From the Indian Ceramics Triennale. Photo: Shine Bhola and Jawahar Kala Kendra.

Indian Ceramics Triennale

Jawahar Kala Kendra

Jacques Kaufmann, To Purify Space, 2018, brick, bamboo, fired clay, mirrors, 11' 9 3⁄4“ × 9' 10 1⁄8” × 9' 10 1⁄8". From the Indian Ceramics Triennale. Photo: Shine Bhola and Jawahar Kala Kendra.

In a dimly lit room, a woman dressed in black slowly poured water from an earthenware pot. Cascading into a transparent tray, the water lapped at the walls of an exquisite miniature city painstakingly constructed of clay. This work, Evanescent Landscape—Svarglok, Jaipur, 2018, by Juree Kim, was inspired by the pink city of Jaipur and by an eighteenth-century Rajasthani miniature painting of Svarglok, the abode of the Hindu gods. Over the course of “Breaking Ground,” the inaugural Indian Ceramics Triennale, the action of the water gradually dissolved the sculpted earth, leading to the gentle collapse of this partly submerged clay city—a poetic and poignant study in ephemerality and erasure. Across the room from Kim’s scene of disintegration, Ester Beck delivered a powerful ode to creation. In her energetic performance video, Matter Is a Centre of Dreaming (Gaston Bachelard)

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the December 2018 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.