Melbourne

View of “Kate Daw and Stewart Russell,” 2018. From left: A Simple Act, 2008; Olympic Project for Human Rights Curtain, 2018; Olympic Project for Human Rights Soft Badge, 2018. Photo: Christo Crocker.

Kate Daw and Stewart Russell

Sarah Scout Presents

View of “Kate Daw and Stewart Russell,” 2018. From left: A Simple Act, 2008; Olympic Project for Human Rights Curtain, 2018; Olympic Project for Human Rights Soft Badge, 2018. Photo: Christo Crocker.

Peter Norman, a white Australian sprinter, is mainly remembered for his role in the 1968 Mexico City Olympic Games, where he won silver in the two hundred meters, with African American athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos winning gold and bronze, respectively. At the medal ceremony, Smith and Carlos famously bowed their heads and each raised a clenched, black-gloved fist as the US national anthem played. Norman acted as an ally, donning an Olympic Project for Human Rights badge along with Smith and Carlos. When Carlos realized he had left his gloves in the Olympic village, Norman suggested that the he wear one of Smith’s gloves (which is why Smith can be seen raising his right hand while Carlos raises his left). This led Smith to later recall that while Norman didn’t raise a fist, he did lend a hand. 

In Australia, artists across an entire spectrum of identifications have explored

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