London

Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Earwitness Inventory, 2018, mixed media. Installation view.

Lawrence Abu Hamdan

Chisenhale Gallery

Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Earwitness Inventory, 2018, mixed media. Installation view.

“A kind of superior journalism” is how art historian Kenneth Clark once thought of Francisco Goya’s The Third of May 1808, 1814, a brutally graphic painting of then-recent political executions. Some two centuries later, employing the latest in digital technologies, investigative artists—among them Lawrence Abu Hamdan, Forensic Architecture, and Trevor Paglen—have fashioned themselves heirs to Goya’s repurposing of art: They seek to inform viewers of unjust and sometimes little-known current events.

Abu Hamdan gained attention last year with the audio work Saydnaya (the missing 19db), 2017, commissioned by the Thirteenth Sharjah Biennial and now reinstalled in a freestanding structure near the entrance to his solo exhibition “Earwitness Theatre.” Inside, as if occupying the beating heart of Abu Hamdan’s gallery/theater, we listen in pitchdarkness to mysterious sounds and

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