São, Paulo

Matheus Rocha Pitta, Reintegração de posse (Repossession Suit), 2018, taipa, secondhand furniture, chain. Installation view. Photo: Matheus Rocha Pitta.

Matheus Rocha Pitta

Casa de Sertanista

Matheus Rocha Pitta, Reintegração de posse (Repossession Suit), 2018, taipa, secondhand furniture, chain. Installation view. Photo: Matheus Rocha Pitta.

Modernist architect and urbanist Lúcio Costa considered taipa, or rammed earth, used in the construction of Brazilian colonial houses, an expression of authentic rural life. He considered these structures made using this technique to be “legitimate things of the earth,” like anthills or fig trees, and thus connected to the very soil that gave the rural family sustenance and meaning. But he also considered taipaa predecessor of the reinforced concrete that he and his peers would put to use in some of the country’s most revered architectural landmarks. In São Paulo, moreover, the rediscovery of such colonial houses also fed into an idealized image of the seventeenth-century fortune hunters known as bandeirantes, remembered less for their brutal oppression of indigenous populations than as daring pioneers who braved the country’s dangerous backlands in order to find riches and open

Sign-in to keep reading

Artforum print subscribers have full access to this article. If you are a subscriber, sign in below.

Not registered for artforum.com? Register here.

SUBSCRIBE NOW for only $50 a year—65% off the newsstand price—and get the print magazine plus full online access to this issue and our archive.*

Order the PRINT EDITION of the December 2018 issue for $17 or the ONLINE EDITION for $5.99.

* This rate applies to U.S. domestic subscriptions.