Vienna

Francesco Gennari, Mausoleo per un verme (Mausoleum for a Worm), 2006, tulip-tree wood, sugar, worm, 24 × 19 1⁄2 × 19 1⁄2"

Simone Fattal and Francesco Gennari

Galerie Hubert Winter

Francesco Gennari, Mausoleo per un verme (Mausoleum for a Worm), 2006, tulip-tree wood, sugar, worm, 24 × 19 1⁄2 × 19 1⁄2"

“Only a very small part of architecture belongs to art: the tomb and the monument,” Adolf Loos famously wrote. “Everything else that fulfills a function is to be excluded from the domain of art.” His call for architects to focus on function rather than aesthetics also sheds light on the connection between representation and death—and thus on all the important themes of this two-person exhibition: mortality, monuments, art, and memory.

Curated by Lorenzo Giusti, the exhibition was divided into two parts, “Simone Fattal: Border Landscapes,” and “Francesco Gennari: Mausoleum for a worm.” Fattal’s ceramic sculptures are of modest size; the largest piece in her show was just under four feet tall. Yet they have a commanding presence with their rough and intentionally loose facture. Visitors were greeted by The Lion, 2008. This unglazed, chunky figure of a crouching beast with two

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