New York

Aneta Grzeszykowska, Beauty Mask #10, 2017, pigment ink
on cotton paper,
237⁄8 × 19 1⁄4". From the series “Beauty Masks,” 2017.

Aneta Grzeszykowska

Lyles & King

Aneta Grzeszykowska, Beauty Mask #10, 2017, pigment ink
on cotton paper,
237⁄8 × 19 1⁄4". From the series “Beauty Masks,” 2017.

The doll is a long-standing device in modern art, from Hans Bellmer to Laurie Simmons and Greer Lankton. You could call it a shortcut to the uncanny and surreal, but that wouldn’t do justice to its lasting power to unsettle—and if you doubted that power, the Polish artist Aneta Grzeszykowska’s show would have given you the lie. Other artists kept coming to mind as I walked through this exhibition—Claude Cahun, Sally Mann, Grzeszykowska’s compatriot Alina Szapocznikow, Arthur Tress, Francesca Woodman—along with movies: Charles Laughton’s poetic frightener The Night of the Hunter (1955), for one, as well as various Frankenstein and golem films and almost any horror film starring a corpse. But Grzeszykowska’s photographs—charming, morbid, disturbing, funny, and forlorn—distinguish themselves from the various precedents they summon.

For a 2017 series of pictures,

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