Berkeley

Harvey Quaytman, Araras, 1973, acrylic and pigment on canvas, 87 × 87".

Harvey Quaytman

Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAMPFA)

Harvey Quaytman, Araras, 1973, acrylic and pigment on canvas, 87 × 87".

An underrecognized figure within the history of modernist abstraction, Harvey Quaytman (1937–2002) worked at the crossroads of Abstract Expressionism, constructivism, and Minimalism while developing his own deeply idiosyncratic approach that both internalized and transformed these various models. The artist’s first retrospective, organized by Apsara DiQuinzio at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, is a revelation. Presenting more than seventy works, grouped according to a number of distinct phases in his oeuvre, the exhibition allows viewers to witness Quaytman’s inventiveness with medium and process and to marvel at the strange, beautiful objects he produced. Long considered an “artist’s artist,” Quaytman was a New York painter of the kind that is now basically extinct, living and working in a rented studio on the Bowery from the early 1970s through the late ’90s,

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