New York

Jim Dine, Late Last Summer, the Rue Madame, 2015, acrylic and sand on wood, 79 7⁄8 × 60 5⁄8". From the series “The Black Paintings,” 2015.

Jim Dine, Late Last Summer, the Rue Madame, 2015, acrylic and sand on wood, 79 7⁄8 × 60 5⁄8". From
the series “The Black Paintings,” 2015.

Jim Dine

Richard Gray Gallery | New York

Jim Dine, Late Last Summer, the Rue Madame, 2015, acrylic and sand on wood, 79 7⁄8 × 60 5⁄8". From the series “The Black Paintings,” 2015.

Pop art provocateur Jim Dine is renowned for humorous works such as The Technicolor Heart (The Big One), 2004—an outdoor sculpture of the titular organ rendered in a queasy blue and embedded with sundry things (including hammers, hatchets, and hands) in a rainbow of colors—and Walking to Bora˚s, 2008, a Brobdingnagian outdoor statue of Pinocchio, located in Sweden. But in 2010, the artist suddenly changed course and began making abstractions. The “Black Paintings” series, 2015, which were on view at Richard Gray Gallery, came out of this shift. As Dine has declared, the images are “painting about paint,” and also seem more vulnerable, human. Black is death and disaster, the dark night of the soul. His bold, slashing, and furious brushstrokes seem fraught with a deep sense of loss. Eunice is Gone, a painting named after his mother, suggested with its aphotic forms eaten

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