New York

Helen Mirra, Straw bale construction, 2016, linen, wool, 12 1/2 x 9 7/8".

Helen Mirra

Peter Freeman, Inc.

“In the context of this exhibition, there will be backwards walkings every morning the week of 5 November.” Those familiar with the oeuvre of Helen Mirra will recognize this odd announcement—appended as a note to the show’s mostly blank press release—as entirely consistent with a life and practice for which the act of walking (backward or otherwise) has long played a crucial role. (On the artist’s website, she dubs herself a “walking experiment.”) For Mirra, as for Stanley Brouwn, Douglas Huebler, and a handful of other artists before her, this routine, while outwardly simple and repetitive, allows for endless and unpredictable variations: the perfect platform for a poetics of the ordinary.

While Mirra did indeed lead her eccentric expeditions around New York’s SoHo neighborhood, the exhibition itself, “Bones are spaces,” consisted of a rather lovely set of small weavings—created from linen,

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